The collectors wife pdf

 

    SCENARIO IN MITRA PHUKAN'S THE COLLECTOR'S WIFE writer, in her novel, The Collector's Wife, shows how in the heightened political climate of the. Collector's Wife () by Mitra Phukan and A Bowstring Winter () by Rukmini, the collector's wife residing in Parbatpuri, Assam faces turmoil and. Phukan's The Collector's Wife & Kiran Desai's The Inheritance of. Loss. Arun Kumar Mukhopadhyay. Assistant Professor in English, Ramkrishna Mahavidyalaya.

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    The Collectors Wife Pdf

    Reading of Mitra Phukan's The Collector's Wife. Dr. Sabreen her novel The Collector's Wife by well known Assamese writer and columnist Mitra Phukan, by. She drew pictures and I looked after my collection (in my dreams). It was always she was a woman of the streets who went off with a foreigner. I was stupid, I. the possessor of a collection assembled by someone else. (although the acquirer of .. to his wife because he doesn't think they would continue it. He v/ants to.

    This listing is for a PDF download which includes instructions as well as pattern files to print at home or alternatively send to a copy shop for AO printouts. Each piece of this mini summer collection is inspired by the relaxed and unapologetically roomy shapes present in Scandinavian and Japanese fashion. Choose soft flowing fabrics for a light breezy wardrobe of clothes that are a joy to wear! The woven trousers are high waisted with either a long wide leg or baggy slightly cropped leg. The waistband has a neat fixed front and the comfort of elastic round the back. The woven top compliments trousers perfectly with its high low hem and is a great wardrobe builder. The sleeves are kept long with a choice of cuff for an all year round staple and the back can either be left plain or with a decorative split. The fit is easy with a focus on ease of movement and a flattering shape that skims over the body. VIEW A key features - Round neck, long sleeves with plain sleeve end, back split, neck and hem facings.

    A brightish idea, what? I doubt if Jeeves in person could have thought up a better one than that. Well, pitch it strong, old lad, and keep steadily before you the fact that I must have my allowance raised. If this film is to end with the slow fade-out on the embrace, at least double is indicated. At that moment the gong sounded, and the genial host came tumbling downstairs like the delivery of a ton of coals.

    I always look back to that lunch with a sort of aching regret. Subconsciously, if you know what I mean, I could see it was pretty special, but I had got the wind up to such a frightful extent over the ghastly situation in 8 No Wedding Bells for Bingo which young Bingo had landed me that its deeper meaning never really penetrated.

    Most of the time I might have been eating sawdust for all the good it did me. Old Little struck the literary note right from the start. He did mention it. How — er — how did you like the bally things? It amazes me that a man as young as you can have been able to plumb human nature so surely to its depths; to play with so unerring a hand on the quivering heart-strings of your reader; to write novels so true, so human, so moving, so vital!

    The good old persp. Was bedewing my forehead by this time in a pretty lavish manner. Just right. If my cook has a fault — which I am not prepared to admit — it is that she is inclined to stress the pepper a trifle in her made dishes. By the way, do you like her cooking? Except once, in the winter of , when a purist might have condemned a certain mayonnaise of hers as lacking in creaminess. There had been several air-raids about that time, and no doubt the poor woman was shaken.

    But nothing is perfect in this world, Mr Wooster, and I have had my cross to bear. For seven years I have lived in constant apprehension lest some evilly-disposed person might lure her from my employment. You may judge of my dismay, Mr Wooster, when only this morning the bolt fell.

    She gave notice! But I am thankful to say the worst has not happened. The matter has been adjusted. Jane is not leaving me. I do not remember having come across it in your books. And, speaking of your books, may I say that what has impressed me about them even more than the moving poignancy of the actual narrative, is your philosophy of life. If there were more men like you, Mr Wooster, London would be a better place.

    I appreciate it! Do you think that? I am ashamed to say that there was a time when I was like other men, a slave to the idiotic convention which we call Class Distinction.

    Jeeves had done it again. He was rather hoping that you might see your way to jerking up the total a bit. You see, a man in my position is compelled to save every penny. It would not be fair to my wife. But I propose to enter upon that holy state almost immediately. The lady who for years has cooked so well for me honoured me by accepting my hand this very morning. I had sent poor old Bingo an outline of the situation by messengerboy shortly after lunch.

    In fact, I greatly desired it. I respect Miss Watson exceedingly, but I have seen for a long time that we were not suited. I was greatly attracted by her when I first met her at a subscription dance at Camberwell. By an odd coincidence it is the same young person that young Mr Little — I have placed the cigarettes on the small table.

    Good night, sir.

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    I mean, if mine had been a noble nature, I would have been all broken up. A resilient bird, Bingo. He may be down, but he is never out. While these little love-affairs of his are actually on, nobody could be more earnest and blighted; but once the fuse has blown out and the girl has handed him his hat and begged him as a favour never to let her see him again, up he bobs as merry and bright as ever.

    Or about anything else, as a matter of fact.

    Everything seemed to be going right. It seemed to me that everything was absolutely for the best in the best of all possible worlds. But have you ever noticed a rummy thing about life? There was a letter from Aunt Agatha on the mantelpiece.

    He was fooling about in the background on some job or other. Mrs Gregson, you know. Oh, hang it all! Anyway, it never 11 Aunt Agatha Speaks her Mind even occurred to me for a moment to give her the miss-in-baulk on this occasion.

    If she said I must go to Roville, it was all over except downloading the tickets. I wonder why she wants me. The only gleam of consolation, the only bit of blue among the clouds, was the fact that at Roville I should at last be able to wear the rather fruity cummerbund I had bought six months ago and had never had the nerve to put on.

    One of those silk contrivances, you know, which you tie round your waist instead of a waistcoat, something on the order of a sash only more substantial. I had never been able to muster up the courage to put it on so far, for I knew that there would be trouble with Jeeves when I did, it being a pretty brightish scarlet.

    Still, at a place like Roville, presumably dripping with the gaiety and joie de vivre of France, it seemed to me that something might be done.

    Roville, which I reached early in the morning after a beastly choppy crossing and a jerky night in the train, is a fairly nifty spot where a chappie without encumbrances in the shape of aunts might spend a somewhat genial week or so. I sympathized with them.

    She had got the whole gang nicely under control by now. All this triumph had produced a sort of grim geniality in her, and she was almost motherly when we met.

    Far better for you than spending your time in stuffy London night clubs. I want to introduce you to a Miss Hemmingway and her brother, who have become great friends of mine. I am sure you will like Miss Hemmingway. A nice, quiet girl, so different from so many of the bold girls one meets in London nowadays.

    Her brother is curate at Chipley-in-the-Glen in Dorsetshire. He tells me they are connected with the Kent Hem-mingways. A very good family. She is a charming girl. All this boosting was so unlike Aunt Agatha, who normally is one of the most celebrated right-and-left-hand knockers in London society. I felt a clammy suspicion. And, by Jove, I was right. You ought to be thinking of getting married. Marriage might make something of you. And I could not wish you a better wife than dear Aline.

    She would be such a good influence in your life. Cursed with too much money, you fritter away in idle selfishness a life which might have been made useful, helpful and profitable. You do nothing but waste your time on frivolous pleasures. You are simply an anti-social animal, a drone.

    Bertie, it is imperative that you marry. Such a surprise! I had no notion that he intended coming to Roville. Sort of trapped feeling, you know what I mean. An inner voice was whispering that Bertram was up against it. The brother was a small round cove with a face rather like a sheep. The resemblance is most striking! She had on a kind of plain dress, and her hair was plain, and her face was sort of mild and saint-like.

    And the thought of it depressed me to such an extent that I felt there was only one thing to be done. I went straight back to my room, dug out the cummerbund, and draped it round the old turn. I turned round and Jeeves shied like a startled mustang.

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    I mean to say, nobody knows better than I do that Jeeves is a master mind and all that, but, dash it, a fellow must call his soul his own. Besides, I was feeling pretty low and the cummerbund was the only thing which could cheer me up. In a place like this a bit of colour and touch of the poetic is expected of you. I am feeling a little low-spirited and need cheering.

    This cummerbund seems to me to be called for. I consider that it has rather a Spanish effect. A touch of the hidalgo. The jolly old hidalgo off to the bull fight. Dashed upsetting, this sort of thing.

    The drive that afternoon was about as mouldy as I had expected. I tottered back to my room to 13 Aunt Agatha Speaks her Mind dress for dinner, feeling like a toad under the harrow.

    Not too much soda, but splash the brandy about a bit. Dashed aloof his manner was. Still brooding over the cummerbund. Yes, sir. And that was, so to speak, that.

    I mean to say, I could hear the wedding bells chiming faintly in the distance and getting louder and louder every day, and how the deuce to slide out of it was more than I could think.

    It really was rummy the way the Hemmingway family had taken to me. I had managed to get a rather decent suite on the third floor, looking down on to the promenade.

    I heaved a sigh, and at that moment there was a knock at the door. The last persons I had expected. I really had thought that I could be alone for a minute in my own room. This made me sit up and take notice. Dashed agitated. At this point the brother, who after shedding a floppy overcoat and parking his hat on a chair had been standing by wrapped in the silence, gave a little cough, like a sheep caught in the mist on a mountain top.

    I rashly persisted in the view that the colour red, having appeared no fewer than seven times in succession, must inevitably at no distant date give place to black. I was in error. I lost my little all, Mr Wooster. There I encountered one of my parishioners, a Colonel Mus-grave, who chanced to be holiday-making over here.

    Indeed, I gazed at him with no little interest and admiration. Little as he might look like one of the lads of the village, he certainly appeared to be real tabasco, and I wished he had shown me this side of his character before.

    He is a hard man. He will expose me to my vic-ah. My vic-ah is a hard man. And he leaves for England tonight. Oh, do say you will! Mr Wooster, will you lend Sidney the money and take these as security? Made me feel like a pawnbroker. More than a touch of popping the watch about the whole business. Only too glad to let you have the money. The brother shook his head. The girl took the piece of paper, shoved it in her bag, grabbed the money and slipped it to brother Sidney, and then, before I knew what was happening, she had darted at me, kissed me, and legged it from the room.

    So dashed sudden and unexpected. I mean, a girl like that. Through a sort of mist I could see that Jeeves had appeared from the background and was helping the brother on with his coat; and I remember wondering idly how the dickens a man could bring himself to wear a coat like that, it being more like a sack than anything else. Then the brother came up to me and grasped my hand.

    Who steals my purse 16 Pearls Mean Tears steals trash. But he that filches my good name robs me of that which enriches not him and makes me poor indeed. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. Good night, Mr Wooster. I blinked at Jeeves as the door shut. These fashionable French watering places are notoriously infested by dishonest characters. But I have seen a great deal of these resorts. I have never forgotten the circumstances. How can there have been anything fishy about the business?

    Very well, then, think before you speak. You had better be tooling down to the desk now and having these things shoved in the hotel safe. While his female accomplice was gratefully embracing his lordship, Soapy Sid substituted a duplicate case for the one containing the pearls and went off with the jewels, the money and the receipt.

    On the strength of the receipt he subsequently demanded from his lordship the return of the pearls, and his lordship, not being able to produce them, was obliged to pay a heavy sum in compensation. It is a simple but effective ruse.

    Brother Sidney! Why, by Jove, Jeeves, do you think that parson was Soapy Sid? Do you really think he was Soapy Sid?

    I recognized him directly he came into the room. Here it is. I opened it, and there were the good old pearls, as merry and bright as dammit, smiling up at me.

    I gazed feebly at the man. I was feeling a bit overwrought. Thanks to Jeeves I was not going to be called on to cough up several thousand quid. I mean, even a chappie endowed with the immortal rind of dear old Sid is hardly likely to have the nerve to come back and retrieve these little chaps. These are genuine pearls and extremely valuable. Absolutely reclining on the good old plush! Am I right or wrong? I think that you will have to restore the pearls.

    To Sid? Not while I have my physique! To their rightful owner. How do you know? And, if I may make the suggestion, I think it might be judicious to stress the fact that they were stolen by-.

    By the dashed girl she was hounding me on to marry; by Jove! Make her stop snootering me for a while? I knocked but no one took any notice, so I trickled in. No welcoming smile for Bertram. Dashed annoying.

    Where did you see them last? They have been stolen. Cut to the quick he seemed. The chambermaid whooped in the corner. I have enough to bear without your imbecilities. Oh, be quiet! Be quiet! The chambermaid continued to go strong. I am convinced of it. It was one of those occasions about which I shall prattle to my grandchildren — if I ever have any, which at the moment of going to press seems more or less of a hundred-to-one shot.

    Aunt Agatha simply deflated before my eyes. Pinched them! Swiped them! The first thief who came along simply walked into your room and pinched your pearls. And instead of admitting that it was all your fault, you started biting this poor man here in the gizzard. You have been very, very unjust to this poor man. Where does she get off? I think she would be jolly well advised to bring an action for — for whatever it is and soak you for substantial damages.

    And the chambermaid looked up inquiringly, as if the sun was breaking through the clouds. Cried the whiskered marvel. Tomorrow you leave my hotel, by great Scotland! I suppose she and the bandit split it outside.

    I turned to Aunt Agatha, whose demeanour was now rather like that of one who, picking daisies on the railway, has just caught the down express in the small of the back. Good heavens! Do you realize that if you had brought the thing off I should probably have had children who would have sneaked my watch while I was dandling them on my knee? And then — well, it was a wrench, but I did it. It had been very dear to me. Give me regular meals, a good show with decent music every now and then, and one or two pals to totter round with, and I ask no more.

    That is why the jar, when it came, was such a particularly nasty jar. It seemed to me that the skies were blue, so to speak, and no clouds in sight. Well, the time had come round again, and Jeeves was in the kitchen giving the understudy a few tips about his duties. By no means intelligent. I suppose, strictly speaking, I ought to have charged in and ticked the blighter off properly in no uncertain voice.

    I merely called for my hat and stick in a marked manner and legged it. But the memory rankled, if you know what I mean. We Woosters do not lightly forget. I brooded like the dickens. I needed a bracer rather particularly at the moment, because I was on my way to lunch with Aunt Agatha. A pretty frightful ordeal, believe me or believe me not, even though I took it that after what had happened at Roville she would be in a fairly subdued and amiable mood.

    The Glossops. Have you met them? Though, of course, he did get a degree of sorts at Oxford, and I suppose you can always fool some of the people some of the time. For money, of course! I looked at the poor fish anxiously.

    To me the girl was simply nothing more nor less than a pot of poison. The brother was a small round cove with a face rather like a sheep. The resemblance is most striking! She had on a kind of plain dress, and her hair was plain, and her face was sort of mild and saint-like.

    And the thought of it depressed me to such an extent that I felt there was only one thing to be done. I went straight back to my room, dug out the cummerbund, and draped it round the old turn. I turned round and Jeeves shied like a startled mustang. I mean to say, nobody knows better than I do that Jeeves is a master mind and all that, but, dash it, a fellow must call his soul his own.

    Besides, I was feeling pretty low and the cummerbund was the only thing which could cheer me up. In a place like this a bit of colour and touch of the poetic is expected of you. I am feeling a little low-spirited and need cheering. This cummerbund seems to me to be called for. I consider that it has rather a Spanish effect.

    A touch of the hidalgo. The jolly old hidalgo off to the bull fight. Dashed upsetting, this sort of thing. The drive that afternoon was about as mouldy as I had expected. I tottered back to my room to 13 Aunt Agatha Speaks her Mind dress for dinner, feeling like a toad under the harrow. Not too much soda, but splash the brandy about a bit.

    Dashed aloof his manner was. Still brooding over the cummerbund. Yes, sir. And that was, so to speak, that. I mean to say, I could hear the wedding bells chiming faintly in the distance and getting louder and louder every day, and how the deuce to slide out of it was more than I could think. It really was rummy the way the Hemmingway family had taken to me.

    I had managed to get a rather decent suite on the third floor, looking down on to the promenade. I heaved a sigh, and at that moment there was a knock at the door. The last persons I had expected. I really had thought that I could be alone for a minute in my own room.

    This made me sit up and take notice. Dashed agitated. At this point the brother, who after shedding a floppy overcoat and parking his hat on a chair had been standing by wrapped in the silence, gave a little cough, like a sheep caught in the mist on a mountain top. I rashly persisted in the view that the colour red, having appeared no fewer than seven times in succession, must inevitably at no distant date give place to black.

    I was in error. I lost my little all, Mr Wooster. There I encountered one of my parishioners, a Colonel Mus-grave, who chanced to be holiday-making over here. Indeed, I gazed at him with no little interest and admiration. Little as he might look like one of the lads of the village, he certainly appeared to be real tabasco, and I wished he had shown me this side of his character before. He is a hard man.

    He will expose me to my vic-ah. My vic-ah is a hard man. And he leaves for England tonight. Oh, do say you will! Mr Wooster, will you lend Sidney the money and take these as security?

    Made me feel like a pawnbroker. More than a touch of popping the watch about the whole business. Only too glad to let you have the money. The brother shook his head.

    The girl took the piece of paper, shoved it in her bag, grabbed the money and slipped it to brother Sidney, and then, before I knew what was happening, she had darted at me, kissed me, and legged it from the room. So dashed sudden and unexpected. I mean, a girl like that. Through a sort of mist I could see that Jeeves had appeared from the background and was helping the brother on with his coat; and I remember wondering idly how the dickens a man could bring himself to wear a coat like that, it being more like a sack than anything else.

    Then the brother came up to me and grasped my hand. Who steals my purse 16 Pearls Mean Tears steals trash. But he that filches my good name robs me of that which enriches not him and makes me poor indeed.

    I thank you from the bottom of my heart. Good night, Mr Wooster. I blinked at Jeeves as the door shut. These fashionable French watering places are notoriously infested by dishonest characters. But I have seen a great deal of these resorts. I have never forgotten the circumstances. How can there have been anything fishy about the business?

    Very well, then, think before you speak. You had better be tooling down to the desk now and having these things shoved in the hotel safe. While his female accomplice was gratefully embracing his lordship, Soapy Sid substituted a duplicate case for the one containing the pearls and went off with the jewels, the money and the receipt.

    On the strength of the receipt he subsequently demanded from his lordship the return of the pearls, and his lordship, not being able to produce them, was obliged to pay a heavy sum in compensation. It is a simple but effective ruse. Brother Sidney! Why, by Jove, Jeeves, do you think that parson was Soapy Sid? Do you really think he was Soapy Sid? I recognized him directly he came into the room.

    Here it is. I opened it, and there were the good old pearls, as merry and bright as dammit, smiling up at me. I gazed feebly at the man. I was feeling a bit overwrought. Thanks to Jeeves I was not going to be called on to cough up several thousand quid. I mean, even a chappie endowed with the immortal rind of dear old Sid is hardly likely to have the nerve to come back and retrieve these little chaps. These are genuine pearls and extremely valuable. Absolutely reclining on the good old plush!

    Am I right or wrong? I think that you will have to restore the pearls. To Sid? Not while I have my physique! To their rightful owner. How do you know? And, if I may make the suggestion, I think it might be judicious to stress the fact that they were stolen by-. By the dashed girl she was hounding me on to marry; by Jove! Make her stop snootering me for a while? I knocked but no one took any notice, so I trickled in. No welcoming smile for Bertram.

    Dashed annoying. Where did you see them last? They have been stolen. Cut to the quick he seemed. The chambermaid whooped in the corner.

    I have enough to bear without your imbecilities. Oh, be quiet! Be quiet! The chambermaid continued to go strong. I am convinced of it. It was one of those occasions about which I shall prattle to my grandchildren — if I ever have any, which at the moment of going to press seems more or less of a hundred-to-one shot.

    Aunt Agatha simply deflated before my eyes. Pinched them! Swiped them! The first thief who came along simply walked into your room and pinched your pearls. And instead of admitting that it was all your fault, you started biting this poor man here in the gizzard.

    You have been very, very unjust to this poor man. Where does she get off? I think she would be jolly well advised to bring an action for — for whatever it is and soak you for substantial damages.

    And the chambermaid looked up inquiringly, as if the sun was breaking through the clouds. Cried the whiskered marvel. Tomorrow you leave my hotel, by great Scotland! I suppose she and the bandit split it outside. I turned to Aunt Agatha, whose demeanour was now rather like that of one who, picking daisies on the railway, has just caught the down express in the small of the back. Good heavens! Do you realize that if you had brought the thing off I should probably have had children who would have sneaked my watch while I was dandling them on my knee?

    And then — well, it was a wrench, but I did it. It had been very dear to me. Give me regular meals, a good show with decent music every now and then, and one or two pals to totter round with, and I ask no more. That is why the jar, when it came, was such a particularly nasty jar. It seemed to me that the skies were blue, so to speak, and no clouds in sight. Well, the time had come round again, and Jeeves was in the kitchen giving the understudy a few tips about his duties. By no means intelligent.

    I suppose, strictly speaking, I ought to have charged in and ticked the blighter off properly in no uncertain voice.

    I merely called for my hat and stick in a marked manner and legged it. But the memory rankled, if you know what I mean. We Woosters do not lightly forget. I brooded like the dickens. I needed a bracer rather particularly at the moment, because I was on my way to lunch with Aunt Agatha. A pretty frightful ordeal, believe me or believe me not, even though I took it that after what had happened at Roville she would be in a fairly subdued and amiable mood.

    The Glossops. Have you met them? Though, of course, he did get a degree of sorts at Oxford, and I suppose you can always fool some of the people some of the time. For money, of course! I looked at the poor fish anxiously. To me the girl was simply nothing more nor less than a pot of poison. One of those dashed large, brainy, strenuous, dynamic girls you see so many of these days. The effect she had on me whenever she appeared was to make me want to slide into a cellar and lie low till they blew the All Clear.

    Yet here was young Bingo obviously all for her. There was no mistaking it. I worship the very ground she treads on! Fred Thompson and one or two fellows had come hi, and McGarry, the chappie behind the bar, was listening with his ears flapping.

    He always reminds me of the hero of a musical comedy who takes the centre of the stage, gathers the boys round him in a circle, and tells them all about his love at the top of his voice. But we walk together in the garden most evenings, and it sometimes seems to me that there is a look in her eyes. Like a sergeant-major. Like a tender goddess. The one I mean is Honoria. I brought him up to town to see the dentist.

    Is that the kid? Pestilential to a degree. But women beat me.

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    I mean to say, as regards nerve. Absolutely with the fish, I give you my solemn word. I quite admit that I was dreadfully mistaken in my opinion of that terrible, hypocritical girl at Roville, but this time there is no danger of an error. By great good luck I have found the very wife for you, a girl whom I have only recently met, but whose family is above suspicion.

    She has plenty of money, too, though that does not matter in your case. The great point is that she is strong, self-reliant and sensible, and will counterbalance the deficiencies and weaknesses of your character. She is just the wife for you. I hope you are not going to be troublesome.

    I told her you would be delighted to come down tomorrow. And, even if you had, you must put it off. Ghastly as the peril was which loomed before me, I was conscious of a rummy sort of exhilaration. It was a tight corner, but the tighter the corner, I felt, the more juicily should I score off Jeeves when I got myself out of it without a bit of help from him.

    Ordinarily, of course, I should have consulted him and trusted to him to solve the difficulty; but after what I had heard him saying in the kitchen, I was dashed if I was going to demean myself. When I got home I addressed the man with light abandon. In fact, you might say on the brink of a precipice, and faced by an awful doom.

    No, no. Thanks very much, but no, no. Cloaks his emotions, if you know what I mean. Honoria was away when I got to Ditteredge on the following afternoon. Her mother told me that she was staying with some people named Braythwayt in the neighbourhood, and would be back next day, bringing the daughter of the house with her for a visit. Rather decent, the grounds at Ditteredge. A couple of terraces, a bit of lawn with a cedar on it, a bit of shrubbery, and finally a small but goodish lake with a stone bridge running across it.

    Sitting on the stonework, fishing, was a species of kid whom I took to be Oswald the Plague-Spot. Bingo was both surprised and delighted to see me, and introduced me to the kid. If the latter was surprised and delighted too, he concealed it like a diplomat. He just looked at me, raised his eyebrows slightly, and went on fishing. How are you? Young Bingo led me off to commune apart. Do you have to be with him all day? How do you manage to stick it?

    You see, She would never forgive me. She is devoted to the little brute. But now all Nature seemed to be shouting at me. I mean you wanting to make a hit with Honoria Glossop and all that.

    Why, take it from me, he would have shoved you behind that clump of bushes over there; he would have got me to lure Honoria on to the bridge somehow; then, at the proper time, he would have told me to give the kid a pretty hefty jab in the small of the back, so as to shoot him into the water; and then you would have dived in and hauled him out.

    I mean to say, suppose the kid turned round and said you had shoved him in, that would make you frightfully unpopular with Her. Oh, happy day! The beauty of the thing was, you see, that nothing could possibly go wrong. Did you say the hill with the windmill? I thought you said the one with the flock of sheep?

    But in this case, nothing like that could happen, because Oswald and Bingo would be on the spot right along, so that all I had to worry about was getting Honoria there in due season. And I managed that all right, first shot, by asking her if she would come for a stroll in the grounds with me, as I had something particular to say to her.

    She had arrived shortly after lunch in the car with the Braythwayt girl. I was introduced to the latter, a tallish girl with blue eyes and fair hair. But business was business — I had fixed it up with Bingo to be behind the bushes at three sharp, so I got hold of Honoria and steered her out through the grounds in the direction of the lake.

    Made me jump a bit. I was concentrating pretty tensely at the moment. We had just come in sight of the lake, and I was casting a keen eye over the ground to see that everything was in order.

    Everything appeared to be as arranged. My watch made it two minutes after the hour. I was just thinking. Kind of shrinking, diffident kind of fellow. Looks on you as a sort of goddess. Rather an ass, perhaps, but well-meaning. You might just bear it in mind, what? She had a penetrating sort of laugh.

    Rather like a train going into a tunnel. He gazed at us with a good deal of dislike. Honoria changed the subject. He might easily fall in. I suppose the distance between the kid and me at this juncture was about five yards, but I got the impression that it was nearer a hundred.

    Then I remembered. The stage seemed to stretch out in front of me like a trackless desert, and there was a kind of breathless hush as if all Nature had paused to concentrate its attention on me personally. Well, I felt just like that now. He merely wiggled his left ear in a rather peevish manner. It was one of those things that want doing quickly or not at all. I shut my eyes and pushed. There was a scrambling sound, a kind of yelp, a scream in the offing, and a splash.

    And so the long day wore on, so to speak. I opened my eyes. The kid was just coming to the surface. Nothing happened. The scheme on that occasion had been that when I put the tray on the table the heroine would come on and say a few words to get me off.

    And all that time I had to stand there, waiting. I understood what these writer-chappies mean when they talk about time standing still.

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